The LMPC class of the American Le Mans racing series has its championship leaders, and they are primed to continue the charge for victory.  CORE autosport hits the temporary two-mile 12-turn street circuit for the Inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix this week; intent upon maintaining and extending their commanding points lead in ALMS.

CORE autosport have the LMPC class on lock down. With drivers Ricardo Gonzalez and Gunnar Jeannette piloting the #06 Excel Consultants/Composite Resources ORECA FLM09 LMPC car to the top of the ALMS driver championship points ladder and team founder Jon Bennett, joined by Frankie Monetcalvo lead the team points championship in the #05 Bayshore Recycling / Composite Resources machine, CORE autosport are focused on only one thing… Winning.  While winning the Long Beach ALMS race earlier this year the Core autosport team struggled for a mixed bag of results at Road America less than two weeks ago.

When asked about Road America and the upcoming Baltimore GP Bennett said, “Road America was another challenging race for the CORE autosport team.  We were at or near the top of the timesheets for most of the weekend, but the race itself was tough, with lots of contact with other cars, walls and more.  We did get one car on the podium, and we're still leading the driver and team championships, which is great.”

He went on to say, “Baltimore is going to be a challenge because small mistakes can be rewarded with big damage.  I've not had a lot of experience on temporary street courses, but I really like them. My driving style is precise and calculated, and driving between the walls rewards that type of style.”

Gunnar Jeannette, clearly excited about the prospect of a new course, said, “I'm definitely looking forward to getting to Baltimore for a number of reasons.  The circuit itself will be alive and change during each and every session because there will be so many cars of all different types on the course over the weekend.”

Jeannette, then went into interesting depth about the course in stating, “You'll have to constantly adjust your driving style and car setup depending on what the track is doing.  So many variables will play into this course. Track surface is key – manhole covers, bumps, transitions from concrete to asphalt – all of that will only come to light behind the wheel of a race car and not a map.  There are even two sections where it looks like we're crossing railroad tracks, which should be very interesting.”

“All of the drivers going to Baltimore are in the same spot.  Track walks will be a great help, but it won't be until you get out there for the first practice session before you really know what you have.”