Williams collaborate to help with Supermarket Fridge efficiency


Williams Advanced Engineering has agreed to collaborate with Aerofoil Energy to develop a new aerodynamic device aimed at reducing the energy consumed by refrigerators in supermarkets.

A significant amount of a supermarket’s operational costs goes towards energy consumption, so the division of the Williams F1 Team is working with Aerofoil Energy to develop specially designed aerofoils to control the direction of the airflow and to keep more of the cool ail inside the refrigerator cabinet.

The aerofoils are also aimed to help reduce the carbon footprint of the supermarkets and make shopping more pleasant for customers.

A number of supermarkets are trailing out and evaluating the new aerofoil technology, including Sainsbury’s, a company that has 1,100 stores countrywide and uses 1% of the United Kingdom’s total energy. Initial trial results show positive and promising results.

‘We’re proud to be giving our fridges a turbo boost with this fantastic aerodynamic technology,” said John Skelton, Head of Refrigeration at Sainsbury’s PLC.

“Aerofoils help the airflow around Formula One cars and can improve their performance – and that’s exactly how they help the fridges in our stores, by keeping the cold air in.

“This Formula One inspired innovation has already shown it can cut carbon produced by major refrigerators.”

Craig Wilson, the Managing Director of Williams Advanced Engineering, believes the technology has global potential to save both operational costs and emissions.

“Williams Advanced Engineering’s mantra is to take the best of Formula One technology and knowhow and work with a range of industries to help improve their products and services,” said Mr Wilson.

“Much of our work focuses on improving energy efficiency and the collaboration with Aerofoil Energy is a perfect example of how Formula One innovations can have a tangible benefit to ordinary people and the environment.

“This technology has global potential and the savings in operational costs and emissions are extremely promising.”