F1 Cars To Feature 360 Degree Cameras For 2018 Season


Credit: Octane Photographic Ltd

Formula 1 Cars for 2018 will run 360 degree cameras that’ll be mounted on the chassis for the 2018 season.

The new cameras will be placed on the cars just in front of the new Halo cockpit protection system, which will be introduced mandatory on the cars next year.

F1 bosses have been keen to improving the racing experience for fans, with tests already been made on the cars this year at previous grands prix.

From 2018, it’ll be made mandatory for cars to run a “golf-ball” sized camera on top of the chassis for a 360 camera angel viewing experience.

Speaking to Motorsport.com, Sahara Force India F1 Team’s Technical Director, Andrew Green has said that the new cameras will give a new perspective for fans to see the action on track.

“There is a 360-degree camera being added to next year’s car on top of the chassis, which will give a different perspective of things.” said Green.

“That will be just in front of the Halo. It’s very impressive.”

Whilst the new camera angels will improve the footage for FOM to use, the introduction of the Halo means other camera positions will have to be moved for next year.

“The only new position that will occur because of the Halo is the high speed camera position, which is the one that looks at the driver in the event of an accident,” Green continued.

“I don’t think this is footage which is readily available or happens that often to be honest. The other camera views around the halo are slightly more obstructive because of the Halo – they are not an improvement. They are not enhanced.”

F1 Technical partner Tata Communications trialled two 360 degree video cameras at the Singapore Grand Prix this year, which has intrigued the F1 bosses whether the cameras can be used for regular TV footage in the future.

Tata wanted to trial and check the data transfer capabilities of the cameras due to the delay 360 degree shots have when it comes to live sporting events. Images from these shots take time to process before being used for production and broadcasting.