Brendon Hartley – Baku City Circuit reminiscent of Macau


Brendon Hartley - Toro Rosso - China
Credit: Peter Fox/Getty Images/Red Bull Content Pool

Red Bull Toro Rosso Honda‘s Brendon Hartley has said that parts of the Baku City Circuit reminds him of the Macau circuit.

Ahead of this weekend’s Azerbaijan Grand Prix, Hartley will contest in Baku for the first time in his career and spoke about how in preparation for the event, he spent time on the simulator and examined past videos.

For his debut around the street of Baku, the Kiwi driver says he is excited to tackling another new circuit on the Formula 1 calendar ahead of this weekend’s action.

“I’m looking forward to going to another new circuit” said Hartley.

“I don’t know how many different circuits I’ve driven in my career but I’m always excited to drive a new one. I think it’s very unique, being a street track, some really interesting corners with no room for error, which is always something I enjoy – probably most of the other drivers do too so we’re all in the same boat.

“From driving it on the simulator, the bit by the castle almost reminds me of Macau, which is one of my favourite tracks. I think I’m going to enjoy it and I’m really looking forward to the fourth race of the season.”

In preparing for the weekend, Hartley has spent time in the simulator and studied ahead of the upcoming race, to get a better understanding of the six kilometre circuit.

Hartley spoke about using his experience from tracks he use to race in past series to help him get a better understanding over the corners in the Azerbaijan capital.

“Apart from all the sim work, plus looking at videos of past races, I’ll be doing as much study as I can, so that I’d like to think that within ten laps, you’re pretty much up to speed” Hartley explains.

“A lot of the work we do on the sim is actually for the engineers to develop the set-up and a small part of it is for the driver, but when you’re going to a new track then a bigger percentage of the work done is for the driver as well so it serves two purposes.

“Obviously there’s always those last few tenths still to come from a track that’s new to you, where knowing every bump in the road, changing conditions, wind direction, all have to be experienced at the actual circuit.

“But when you’ve driven hundreds of circuits in your life, you try and piece them together and look at one corner and compare that to somewhere else that you’ve been.

“Obviously experience counts for a lot when you’re learning a new track.”