Review: MotoGP 15 Videogame


With a release date close to both Project CARS and F1 2015, Milestone needed to ensure that their latest MotoGP videogame would be a strong challenger to its Slightly Mad Studios and Codemasters rivals, and they might just have done that.

Milestone began their MotoGP range in 2013, and has so far been a yearly release. The reception previously has been focused on poor graphics which were contrasted by an impressive content list, the latter being something difficult to achieve when a game is based on a single series.

MotoGP 14 was released onto both the old-gen PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 consoles and their next-gen replacements, but this rushed release left many PlayStation 4 and Xbox One players feel disappointed, with what was clearly a game designed for old consoles.

Once again, MotoGP 15 is available on both generation consoles, which will of course increase its reach. The graphics are still a major issue, though.

Whereas the motorbikes themselves look incredible, clear and – most important of all – accurate, the landscape still lacks the high definition appearance that other games have so successfully replicated.

The game was announced to have improved landscape graphics, with the ‘individual grains of sand’ being a major advertisement. Honestly, I can’t see any difference as compared to either of its predecessors.

This isn’t a problem, though.

The game redeems itself with its incredible content. All 18 tracks from the current MotoGP calendar are, as expected, included, but the bikes roster is massive. Included are not only all of the 2015 machines from the MotoGP, Moto2 and Moto3 seasons, but also the same from last year. Furthermore, a selection of ‘classic’ bikes are present.

This is a nice touch, but perhaps a little pointless. From what I can see, the only reason to use the 2014 bikes is in the ‘2014 Real Events’ mode in which you can replicate certain moments from each of last year’s race, such as the Marquez/Rossi last-lap battle at Qatar.

A new addition to the fairly standard career mode is the ability to create your own team in place of signing a contract with an existing one. The idea is that you earn money for each race you complete, even when riding for an official team, and use this to buy better bikes for when you decide to sign with a sponsor for your own team.

However, this is still a section of the game that is lacking in detail. The livery design tool is extremely basic, where you choose a few colours and one of about three (depending on the bike) designs. Your team is always just yourself, too, as it is impossible to sign a team-mate. Again, this is just a little issue as it isn’t particularly inaccurate, given the one-rider teams even in MotoGP, but still an area where MotoGP 15 is lacking.

If you’re looking for an immaculate, realistic simulation, then MotoGP 15 is not for you, but perhaps Project CARS is. MotoGP 15’s key audience are fans of the series that just want to race as (or against) Marc Marquez or Valentino Rossi. The poor landscape graphics are easily ignored and after playing it for a while, it is only following playing something like Project CARS that you’ll realise that they are dated.

  • Game Title: MotoGP 15
  • Availabile on: Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One
  • Reviewed on: Playstation 4
  • Modes: Single Player, Multi Player
  • Developer: Milestone S.r.l.
  • Publisher: Milestone S.r.l.
  • Distributor: Bandai Namco Entertainment
  • Official URL: http://motogpvideogame.com/