Elimination Qualifying still not working


After failing once again to impress, the new elimination style qualifying format has come under further scrutiny, with many teams bosses calling for it to be scrapped completely, with a move back to the 2015 method the only real option.

The teams, Bernie Ecclestone, Jean Todt and Pirelli will meet today in Bahrain to discuss what to do going forward, but the worry is that the current style will just be tweaked rather than removed completely, with some teams still willing to oppose a full overhaul.

Toto Wolff made his thoughts very clear on the subject, when talking to motorsport.com this weekend:

“If somebody puts a block in the system to make us stuck, we should publicly crucify him in the paddock…”

After trialling the new format for a second time in Bahrain, many observers were in agreement that it was still not working, however FIA president Todt advised that a number of options would be put forward to the teams for the next round in China, including the preferred Q3 shoot-out and having extra tyres. The Mercedes boss however is not sure that further changes are the right way to go:

“When I spoke to Jean Todt last week, he said he wants to approach it in a structured way.

“He thought on Q1 and Q2 there was maybe something to learn, and therefore he would rather go for the Melbourne format or the hybrid version once again, to find out if it is all bad.”

“And if it we realise it is all bad then probably the most realistic scenario is to go back to 2015 qualifying. He said that to me.”

“We are not in the position any more that after we have changed it twice, to do experiments for Shanghai because we would look like fools.”

“But maybe there is a different format that could be interesting. Today someone mentioned single lap shoot-out for last eight drivers, honestly I think that could be interesting.”

The more those in charge meander over what to do, the more foolish F1 becomes in the eyes of onlookers, with nobody seemingly able to make a decision about what is best for the sport. Over complicating things, and making changes where none were needed – is this really the way that F1 should be run?